How to open a complex JSON record in Power BI and Power Query

Today I’ll show you a very useful technique how to deal with a JSON record that contains a wild mixture of different elements like this:

If you click on one of the expandable elements, their content will be shown, but you’ll loose all the “surrounding” information (metadata) that is visible now. This is often an issue, regardless if you want to create multiple tables from it to build a star-schema or just need a handful of fields or a denormalized table. But with a little help from M, you’re good to go:

Table.FromRecords( { MyJsonRecord } )

Will returns this:

With this move, every expansion of one of the expandable elements will keep the existing data in place:

Create one big flat table

Simply expand one element after each other to create a denormalized table

Create star schema

For multiple tables, keep this query and reference it to create you (sub-)tables. Always keep the Id-column as the key (!) to combine all the tables in your data model later. (Provided you use this in a function for multiple entities/series)

Best is to play with it, so just past this code into the advanced editor:

 

If your JSON-record has a different structure with “just” header and data in different fields, this technique will be more suitable for you: http://www.thebiccountant.com/2016/04/23/universal-json-opener-for-quandl/

Enjoy & stay queryious 🙂

Bill of Material (BOM) Explosion Part2: Costing in Excel and PowerBI

Following up on the BOM-explosion: A comment reminded me that I had missed to present the costing techniques to calculate the total costs of each (sub)-product.

Reversing the aggregation direction

What I had shown is how to “aggregate” from parent down to child-level to retrieve the total quantity of each component within a BOM (“How many of each (sub-) components do we have to order (or build) for that bike?”) (1).

Now we reverse the aggregation direction and aggregate the total (!) quantities back up to the parents (2).

And, as this doesn’t make too much sense in an economical way, the second aggregation will be their prices (3). This will give us the sum of all part-costs (“How much will the order of all the parts cost us?”). This is also very useful for planning purposes or reconciliation of prices for intermediate products with your master data.

And if your model holds sales-data as well, you can calculate the totals costs of your total sales within each period. (4)

VAR 1: Using classical hierarchies

Read more

Pivot your table-relationships in Power BI and Power Pivot

While the relationships view of the datamodel provides a very good overview which tables are connected to each other, one cannot see at a glance on which field they are connected to each other.

This is where a pivot table-view of the field-connections can be really helpful:

Pivot-table-view:

Table-Fields-Connections in Pivot-View

 

Here you see the tables on the many-side in the rows and in the columns are the tables on the one-side (of course you can change that). Add some slicers if your model is very large.

Read more

Bill of Materials (BOM) solution in Excel and PowerBI

Edit 12-Jan-18: Code and file updated (robustness & speed)

Handling multilevel bill of materials (BOM) without VBA in Excel and PowerBI is now a piece of cake: Just pass 4 parameters into the M-function below and it will return a table that holds everything you need for:

  1. Explosion

  2. Order list (“total quantities”)

3. Implosion (“where used”): Will be covered in next blogpost

The format of the input-data for this function needs to be like the example used from the Adventure Works 2008-database, where all products on the top of the hierarchy also have an entry in the child-column (the components), leaving the parent column blank:

BOM-Function

Read more

KPIs in Easy Profit and Loss for PowerBI

Welcome to the last part of my Easy Profit & Loss series where I will cover KPIs in rows & columns:

1) KPIs in columns

Show all your figures as a percent of turnover for example: Nice & easy: Divide current figure by the total sum of turnover:

Turnover% =
ABS (
    DIVIDE (
[ActSign],
        CALCULATE (
[ActSign],
            FILTER (
                ALL ( IndividualAccountsLayout ),
IndividualAccountsLayout[Description in Report] = “Income”
            )
        )
    )
)
DAX Formatter by SQLBI

We need to leave the current row context to retrieve the turnover-value in each row, therefore the ALL.

2) KPIs in rows

Read more