Export large amount of data from Power BI desktop visuals

I’m going to show how to export data from visuals in Power BI Desktop that’s too big to be downloaded by the native functionality and therefore returns this error-message:

Export data from visuals

Check if you really need this

Although the method is fairly simple, there are simpler methods if you just need the raw data from your data model (and not the specific aggregations or measures that the visual contains): Read more

Export data from Power BI to csv using Python

In this blogpost I show you my M-Python-function that I use to export data from Power BI to csv files (Export Python).

Why Python?

I prefer it to R mostly because I don’t have to create the csv-file(names) in advance before I import data to it. This is particularly important for scenarios where I want to append data to an existing file. The key for this task is NOT to use the append-option that Python offers, because M-scripts will be executed multiple times and this would create a total mess in my file. Instead I create a new file with the context to append and use the Import-from-folder method instead to stitch all csvs back together. Therefore I have to dynamically create new filenames for each import. So when the M-Python-scripts are executed repetitively here, the newly created file will just be overwritten – which doesn’t do any harm.

Read more

Use R to export data from Power BI

Edit 03 Aug 2016: With the July 2016 release you can now run your R-scripts directly in the query-editor (so no row-limit any more!). No need to go via the visuals. But this will limit you to export datasets from the query-editor, so no DAX.

Edit 22 Jan 2016: Currently this method is limited to 150k rows! It will drop all others without warning!

Edit 25 Jan 2016: 150k rows is the limit on all R-scripts at the moment (link). A warning sign will be shown on the image. Will create a new blogpost if this changes – so stay tuned (by following this blog, Twitter or LinkedIn)

With the December release, Microsoft enabled Power BI’s content to be fetched from the R-feature. So instead of plotting this data to the screen, could we just export it to a file?

Yes we can:

write.table(trim(dataset), file=”your filepath & filename.txt”, sep = “\t”, row.names = FALSE);

write.table has a lot of options, which are explained here. I’ve only used a few here: Exactly defining the location where the output-file shall be stored (file=), setting tab as delimiter (sep=”\t”) and skipping row names, which would be an index in our example here.

In addition to that, I had to get rid of trailing whitespaces that somehow sneaked into the table (trim(dataset)). Therefore the gdata-package is needed. So the full R-code looks like this:

require(gdata)
write.table(trim(dataset), file=”your filepath & filename.txt”, sep = “\t”, row.names = FALSE)
plot(dataset);

Here you have to make sure to turn the slashes in the filepath: So if your path looks like this: C:\Users\Imke\Desktop\Rfile.txt you need to write it like this: C:/Users/Imke/Desktop/Rfile.txt

NEW: You find a function for this export here: https://github.com/ImkeF/M/blob/master/LibraryR/Table.ExportToCsv.pq , it swaps the slashed automatically.

Let’s take this as a start that will probably fulfill many users need to quickly export data from Power BI to simple text files. Further use cases I see are:

Read more