Bill of Materials Implosion or “Where used Analysis” in Excel and Power BI

This is the last part of my little series about bill-of-materials (BOM) calculations made easy with M in Power BI and Power Query: The implosion that shows where each part is used:

BOM: “Where used?”

BOM Where used analysis

 

When we look closely at the table “BOMReport” from the previous post, we see that the data is already there: “PathExplode” shows that the component “HL Spindle/Axis” (1) is used in the TopParentProduct “Road 150 Red, 62” (2) via some intermediate products (3):

BOMReport holds that information already

 

And if we filter on the example from the pivot-table from above, we can spot that pattern as well:

All we have to do is to create one row for each “Where-used” item. But as we have columns for the compenent itself already as well as for the TopParentProduct, we actually only want to create additional rows for the intermediate products.

Therefore we could split the column “PathExplode” up into its components. But that’s not necessary because it has been generated from the lists in column “PathItem”. So we just have to eliminate the first and the last item from those lists and expand them:

M-Code to extract the intermediate parts:

M-code to extract and expand the intermediate products

M-Code as text: BOM_ImplosionCalc1.txt

Subscribers can download the Excel-file:   BOM_ImplosionCalc1.xlsx

Enjoy & stay queryious 🙂

Bill of Material (BOM) Explosion Part2: Costing in Excel and PowerBI

Following up on the BOM-explosion: A comment reminded me that I had missed to present the costing techniques to calculate the total costs of each (sub)-product.

Reversing the aggregation direction

What I had shown is how to “aggregate” from parent down to child-level to retrieve the total quantity of each component within a BOM (“How many of each (sub-) components do we have to order (or build) for that bike?”) (1).

Now we reverse the aggregation direction and aggregate the total (!) quantities back up to the parents (2).

And, as this doesn’t make too much sense in an economical way, the second aggregation will be their prices (3). This will give us the sum of all part-costs (“How much will the order of all the parts cost us?”). This is also very useful for planning purposes or reconciliation of prices for intermediate products with your master data.

And if your model holds sales-data as well, you can calculate the totals costs of your total sales within each period. (4)

VAR 1: Using classical hierarchies

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