Dynamic duration calculation using DAX in Power BI and Power Pivot

While it is fairly easy to calculate the difference between 2 dates in DAX using DATEDIFF, it is a bit more demanding if you want to exclude weekends and holidays or filter the duration on certain date-intervals, so only get a part of it. Also if you want to return on date-time-level instead of only counting net-workdays.This is where this new technique for dynamic duration calculation can come in handy.

We can use the basic technique that I’ve described here and modify it by adding 2 columns to the calculated table:

  1. Duration per day on a Date-Time-level
  2. Marker-column if weekday or not (this assumes that you have a column in your date-table which indicates if the day shall be considered as weekday or not)

1_duration_calculation

The duration-calculation needs to handle the cases where only parts of the day are to be counted: If the event starts and ends at the same day, the difference between those figures has to be taken. If on the other hand, the event spans multiple days, for the start-day the time until the end of the day has to be calculated while for the end-days the time from the beginning of the day is the right one. The other days count as full days with 1. Hence these 4 cases.

Let’s have a final look at our simple measures:

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Analyzing events with a duration in DAX – further simplification

Alberto Ferrari has recently published a very smart concept how to analyze events with a duration in DAX, which you should read here, if you haven’t done yet. It simplifies the necessary DAX-syntax and speeds up the calculations as well. My following approach simplifies the DAX-syntax even more, but it comes with a (very tiny) premium for performance and will also increase the file size a bit. So you have the choice 🙂

I’m transforming the calculated table into a “real” fact-table which enables me to use simple 1:n-relations to the other (now) dimension-tables:

T1datamodel

The formula starts from Alberto’s first version, but uses the Date instead of the DateKey (yellow). Then there will be some columns added which we need for following calculations (green). Then you see that the DailyProductionValue is calculated at a different place and also has a much simpler syntax. At last there are some other columns for further calculations: “Shipped” and “Ordered” will create the bridge for the “missing” connections to the date-table:

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