Goal seeking and XIRR in PowerBI and PowerQuery

If you want to solve Excels XIRR-function with M in PowerBI or PowerQuery you have to use a goal-seek algorithm. I tried it with a binary-search and the results were quite good (on my scale):

Wondering if there are other solutions out there or different techniques regarding the “helper”-elements I had to include here, so please come forward 🙂

Goal-seek for XIRR

Code:  GoalSeekXIRR.txt

The goal-value is formulated in a way that it should be zero, as this is what the binary-search procedure is aiming at. In this case it’s the XNPV. Other cases could be Break-Even for example, where the accumulated sales match the accumulated costs. In that case you would write: Result = sales – costs .

Subscribers can check it out in this file: GoalSeekForXIRR.xlsx

Enjoy & stay queryious 🙂

Bill of Materials (BOM) solution in Excel and PowerBI

Handling multilevel bill of materials (BOM) without VBA in Excel and PowerBI is now a piece of cake: Just pass 4 parameters into the M-function below and it will return a table that holds everything you need for:

  1. Explosion

  2. Order list (“total quantities”)

3. Implosion (“where used”): Will be covered in next blogpost

The format of the input-data for this function needs to be like the example used from the Adventure Works 2008-database, where all products on the top of the hierarchy also have an entry in the child-column (the components), leaving the parent column blank:

BOM-Function

BOM-code beautified with Lars Schreiber’s M-editor: goo.gl/KW4p8Q

txt-file for download: BOM_Code.txt

The query “Invoked Function” invokes the function and needs the following parameters adjusted to your BOM-table:

  1. “Table”: Name of the query that holds your BOM-table
  2. “Parent”: Name of the column that holds the (parent) product ID or name
  3. “Child”: Name of the column that holds the (child) component ID or name
  4. “Qty”: Name of the column that holds the quantity per produced item

This query will be loaded to the datamodel and there I’ve added some DAX-PATH-columns that might come in handy for some cases.

New to M?

Watch this video where I show how to use the function code with your own data:

Details for techies and M-code-fans:

This technique is MUCH faster than the PC-solution I’ve posted here! (…just don’t ask me why & be prepared for significant performance drop offs once you try to modify anything…) It can also return the path for children with multiple parents, so an excellent workaround for this missing functionality of the DAX PATH-function (check datamodel in file). All other PATHx-functions will work, so just take the PATH from M. (Also the dynamic creating of multiple columns from the post above still works fine)

Noticed the clean code in step “AddFields”? M can look like a serious programming language once you strip off the elements that makes it a live programming language 😉

Subscribers can download the file with sample data and the pivots shown above:   BoM-Table4_adj.xlsx

Stay tuned until next week when I will post the pattern for the BOM-implosion (“where used”)

Edit 2017-May-14: Performance of this solution in Excel can decrease rapidly with larger dataset while it runs good in Power BI Desktop. Read details and workaround here.

Enjoy & stay queryious 😉

KPIs in Easy Profit and Loss for PowerBI

Welcome to the last part of my Easy Profit & Loss series where I will cover KPIs in rows & columns:

1) KPIs in columns

Show all your figures as a percent of turnover for example: Nice & easy: Divide current figure by the total sum of turnover:

Turnover% =
ABS (
    DIVIDE (
[ActSign],
        CALCULATE (
[ActSign],
            FILTER (
                ALL ( IndividualAccountsLayout ),
IndividualAccountsLayout[Description in Report] = “Income”
            )
        )
    )
)
DAX Formatter by SQLBI

We need to leave the current row context to retrieve the turnover-value in each row, therefore the ALL.

2) KPIs in rows

Read more

Guide for switching Signs in Power BI and Power Pivot (bypassing Unary Operators in DAX)

In finance & accounting, you very rarely report the figures with the signs of their source systems, but switch (certain) signs according to different needs. Instead of using unary operators for it, I’ll present an easy and dynamic way for it in Power BI and Power Pivot using DAX. It will cover the following 3 main scenarios:

  • 1_SwitchAll: All signs are switched (red)
  • 2_SwitchExpLiab: Expenses and liabilities are switched back to their original values (green)
  • 3_BWT_Indiv: Only the main figure for expenses (or liabilities) carries a minus, all following positions specifying the expenses are (principally) reported as positives (blue)

 

Switching signs in Power BI and Power Pivot without unary operators

I’m using the sample data from this article but changed the source-data to a double-bookkeeping structure. There signs are used and the transaction entries in your ledger table always add up to zero. This is a method that prevents errors when posting and can also be used to prevent errors in reporting. If you keep the signs in your reporting system, all you have to do is add up the relevant figures and the returned (absolute) figures will always be correct. If you have read my previous articles on Easy P&L, you have seen this method in action: No minus-operation there, just a simple stupid adding of all accounts who fall into several (sub-) total categories via the bridge-table.

The Account-table also contains of (sub-) totals and the column “AccountType” shows if the positions are regarded as Turnover (Revenue) or Expenses:

Table “Accounts”

1_SwitchAll

My values on “1_SwitchAll” corresponds to “FinalValue” in the article above. The revenues come from consultancy and coursed provided. But the revenue for courses don’t just consist of attendee rates, but the costs for catering and paid instructors shall be deducted (highlighted in yellow). So the “good” numbers that contribute to cash in your pocket shall be reported without a sign and the “bad” numbers that result in an outflow of cash shall be reported with a minus. Within the expenses category, the costs carry a minus and the travel refunds (highlighted in orange), which are cash positive, are reported as positives.

2_SwitchExpensesLiabilities

Another requirement that is often used for balance-sheet-reporting or reports that only report on cost-situations, require that the costs or liabilities are reported without signs. … Principally, because the reimbursements/cost deductions shall be reported with an opposite sign (to show the adverse effect to the cashflow). This is what “2_SwitchExpLiab” shows (not covered in the article).

3_BWT (“BossWantsThat”)

Last but not least comes a typical “BossWantsThat”-requirement: Basically some strange stuff that you just have to deliver. Here the main categories “Revenues” and “Expenses” shall be shown with the signs that reflect the cash-direction, but all specifications that follow below shall be reported without signs (again: Principally, because positions with opposite cash-effects than the main category shall carry inverted signs).

Reporting techniques covered with this approach

Read more