How to expand a column that cannot be expanded in Power BI and Power Query in Excel

Especially when working with JSON-data, you might end up with a column that has elements of mixed types in it. The expand column – arrows will be missing, but some elements still need to be expanded, like here:

But there is an easy way to fix it:

Transform to expandable column

Table.TransformColumns(Source, {{“Column1”, each if Value.Is(_, type list) then _ else {_} }} )

It transforms the “Column1” from table “Source” by checking, if the content of the each row ( _ ) is of type list and if yes, keep that value ( _ ) and if not, transform it to a list (by framing it into curly brackets {_} )

Syntax for tables

Table.TransformColumns(Source, {{“Column1”, each if Value.Is(_, type table) then _ else #table({“Column1”}, {{_}} ) }} )

Syntax for records

Table.TransformColumns(Source, {{“Column1”, each if Value.Is(_, type record) then _ else [a=_] }} )

File for Subscribers to download: HTExpandColumnThatCannotBeExpanded.zip

This technique should be applied to columns where the expandable elements all have the same structure. If that’s not the case, you should use this technique instead.

Enjoy & stay queryious 😉

Table.TransformColumns – alternative in PowerBI and PowerQuery in Excel

This article shows a trick for a little problem that annoyed me for quite some time: How to get Table.TransformColumns transforming the values of a column with a reference to a value (from the same row) of another column?

1 Replace text by a value from another column

So instead of adding a new column where the “*” is replaced by the value from column “WhildcardValue”, I just want to perform the replacement-operation in the original “Text”-column, so that I don’t have to rename and delete the other columns later:

So far, I always ended up fighting with Table.TransformColumns-function and got quite frustrated because I couldn’t find a way to reference the (row-) value of the other column. As it turns out, I was fighting the wrong target here, because Table.ReplaceValue is actually the saviour for this challenge:

1.1 Check column “Text” -> Transform -> Replace Values

So in (4) we just filled in a dummy-value, which we’re going to replace with a reference to the desired column: “each [WildcardValue]” like this:

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SQL-query folding bug still alive and sucking in PowerBI and PowerQuery in Excel

Edit: There is currently no interest at Microsoft to change the current behaviour: http://community.powerbi.com/t5/Issues/Bug-Query-folding-not-working-with-non-SQL-datasource/idi-p/225100#M11611 .

I found that this workaround works also pretty well (faster in most cases), as long as your filter-tables are not too long: http://community.powerbi.com/t5/Desktop/Parameterized-SQL-Query-with-query-folding/td-p/171503

Are your SQL queries that filter with a non-SQL-table slow in PowerBI and PowerQuery in Excel? Then this might be of interest for you:

Nearly 2 years ago when I published my first blogpost about the bug that prevents query folding on SQL-sources when filtered by non-SQL-sources, PowerBI was still so new that I even didn’t mention it in my blogpost. I had enormous problems with some clients work with performance and spent 2-digit hours on figuring out the reason with some good help from the TechNet-Forum.

Today I was notified that “this bug was deemed as not high-pri enough to warrant a fix”. So it’s well alive and sucking: In Excel as well as in PowerBI. Considering how many people read my article, I found it worth to mention again and provide an improved solution. It is a function that’s easy to implement and takes the name of the tables and its key-columns as parameters:

Code to fix Query-Folding bug in PowerBi and PowerQuery

Code to fix Query Folding Bug in PowerBI and PowerQuery

And the code to copy: FilterSQLTable.txt

Hope this prevents you from wasting precious time.

Non-linear Break-Even Analysis in PowerBI

A break-even analysis tells you at which value of the parameter in question your profit-calculation will turn positive (link). Here we need to sell at least 173 at a given price of 20 before we’ve recovered all our costs:

If your variable costs are constant, you can solve it by this formula:

BreakEvenQuantity = Total Fixed Costs / (Unit Sale Price - Unit Variable Costs)

You’ll find tons of examples on how to do this in Excel like here .

Non-linear cost structure

But in real life, the variable costs often depend on certain quantities as you get discounts for purchasing large amounts. The following table shows a cost structure with fix costs in row 1. The 3rd column “FixOrQty” indicates if the cost item is fix or dependent on the quantity (Qty). The 2nd row contains a variable cost that is constant with 2 for all quantities. Row 3&4 show a variable cost of 8 for quantities up to 100 and if you purchase more than 100 the costs will be lowered to 2 for all additional quantities. Row 5-7 have a similar structure, but with 3 quantity ranges:

 Solve with goal-seek algorithm

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